ROBIN product update: new web form seamlessly integrates live chat & email – and more!

Michiel Gaasterland
Sep 30, 2014 Michiel Gaasterland

Howdy! It’s been a while since the last update on this blog. Not that we haven’t been publishing! Throughout the summer we have continuously been publishing posts over at our other blog ‘Definitive Guide to Customer Service for Online Stores’.

Moreover, we’ve been busy developing new features to help you - eCommerce storeowners - deliver better service with less effort.

Let’s take a look at what our development team been up to this summer and start with an optimization we rolled out on the ROBIN website today:

Technical Internships at ROBIN

Koen Schipper
Jan 7, 2013 Koen Schipper

At Robin Software we make Robin, a tool that supports webstores to provide service to their customers across channels, Twitter, webform, e-mail and soon Facebook and chat. We work on a daily base with a product owner, 3 developers, a tester and a designer on this product. The team works with the agile development methodology, where we recently switched from Scrum to Kanban. We use good engineering practices, such as BDD, TDD Continous integration, and Continous delivery and automated UI tests.

The team uses a development environment where we deploy automated builds to our OTAP environments that run on Azure. The product is constructed using a multi-layer architecture and asynchronous processing processes. Our team consists of motivated people working in an informal atmosphere.

Today, customer service is all about speed

Patrick Speijers
Nov 20, 2012 Patrick Speijers


Today, customer service is all about speed.

Go into any shopping centre, and you’ll see that there are countless shops that sell clothes, any number of shoe shops, and even plenty of bookstores. With the shift into the online world, getting someone to look at what you have to offer, and buy it, is even more difficult, if you take into account that going to another shop is just a click away.

The deciding factor, that makes customers return to the same shop over and over again is (usually) service. Customer service. Because we like it when the barista knows how we drink our coffee in the morning, we enjoy having the butcher call us by name and offer us the latest prime cut of rib, and it’s great to walk into a shop and not feel the immediate pressure to buy something.

If you're not happy tell us, if you're happy tell others!

Patrick Speijers
Nov 13, 2012 Patrick Speijers


I have a good friend who doesn’t believe in tipping waiters 10 percent. It’s not that she’s stingy - far from it. I’ve seen her leave $10 on a $15 lunch. It’s just that she believes that you should tell the business exactly what you thought of their service, not what they think that you should pay for that service.

According to her philosophy, the tips show the restaurant what people really think of their service. If the waiter was excellent, and the service was amazing, she gives generously, and not only does the restaurant know that they has done well, she’ll tell her friends about it. If the waiter was rude and the service was poor, she will give very little tip (and in one memorable instance, no tip at all), making sure that the business knows that they did extremely badly - and she won’t go back there again, or take her friends there.

Feedback is awesome

Patrick Speijers
Oct 30, 2012 Patrick Speijers

Feedback is awesome.

Customer feedback is even awesomer.

Customer feedback helps improve your services, which in turn means more customers, and even more feedback, which you can use to improve your services, which in turn.... :)

Now, it’s a well known fact that most people don’t like leaving feedback. They may ask a couple of questions, but even if they do have feedback to give, they don’t always spell it out for you. So you have to learn to read between the lines.

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